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Posted by on Feb 2, 2014 in Featured, Skill WOW | 2 comments

Skill WOW 18: What is a Good Fake?

Skill WOW 18: What is a Good Fake?

 

This is largely a follow up on discussions and questions that arose from this this video on practicing good fakes. There are a lot of things one can do to improve ones ‘faking’ ability, but the major point of this video is try and help you to move (and ‘stand’) like a dangerous thrower. This is a skill in and of itself. Not only will this help to keep defenders honest, but it also will help you have a wider range of throwing options available.

I’m adding the referenced videos here momentarily…fyi..

 

 

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Posted by on Jan 26, 2014 in Featured, Skill WOW | 2 comments

Skill WOW 17: 50 Yard Scoobers

Skill WOW 17: 50 Yard Scoobers

 

As promised earlier…developing scoobers for distance.

Notes:

– If you are sensitive to lighting changes and jerky movements, this video may not be for you… 🙁

– Thanks for Odie for being a guinea pig for this video, his first time working through scoobers from this paradigm and he did great (despite almost crushing the cameraman with a disc). Thanks to said cameraman as well, for almost giving the flatball sacrifice…you know who you are.

– Hit me up for questions or clarifications, you really have to have an early and very vertical release point / motion to be able to throw those blades in the beginning.

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Posted by on Jan 19, 2014 in Featured, Skill WOW | 0 comments

Skill WOW 16: Execution Boxes

Skill WOW 16: Execution Boxes

 

Notes:

1. There are definitely some critiques of Coyle’s The Talent Code but I have found value in using methods like this to teach different ‘types of skill’.

2. Our demo here was a bit limited (see players running into nets) and the surface not ideal for sharp cutting, nonetheless there is a lot of value grooving these patterns. Like most of the drills I have presented, this drill is scalable to a variety of speeds, skill levels, etc.

3. Adjust your ‘points’ or ‘rewards’ (or preferred lack thereof) as needed.

4. Box size we use is about 15-20 yards wide, 8 yards upfield from the thrower, and 5 yards backfield from the thrower.

5. I don’t travel on that flick 😉 (indoors it felt different and I thought at first I might have). If you thought I did at first glance, you should probably start questioning how often you should be calling travels….

 

Initial Pivot Point

Initial Pivot Point

Beginning Release

Beginning Release

Already Released

Already Released

Pivot foot coming up

Pivot foot coming up

 

 

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Posted by on Jan 12, 2014 in Featured, Skill WOW | 0 comments

Skill WOW 15: Quick and High Backhand Breakdown

Skill WOW 15: Quick and High Backhand Breakdown

 

Note to selves: Yeah, we took a slight audio quality and video stability step backward in this one….#unioncameraguys (it’s a joke, relax #formerlivingwageorganizer)

1st point: Short, quick backhand drill.

  • I can’t recommend doing this enough. Should help with all your backhand release points and motions. There is some good evidence (again, check out Daniel Coyle’s work) that ‘hard skill’ gains can be made most efficiently by breaking a skill down into ‘chunks’ and mastering those component pieces. While there may not be 100% agreement on this point in the research, I have found it useful in my own coaching and skill development. It seems to pass the smell test.
  • Since this ‘drill’ is a useful on-field skill in and of itself, working this into your regular throwing routine is a no-brainer. If you want to see how useful short, quick release backhands can be, you don’t have to go very far. Watch Sockeye’s ‘small ball’ offense at work this past season or the ‘throw and go’ work utilized by many elite teams. A good progression once you have begun mastering quick backhands is to use them in drills such as my ‘throwback give and go’ box drill (though as demonstrated in the drill, you should try to develop a variety of release points).

2nd point: Shift. Set. Serve.

  • Work on smoothing the motion out over time, but I find moving through these three distinct ‘chunks’ and pausing at each to be a good starting point and ongoing reference (I try to demonstrate these three phases with a short pause when I throw with Aidan at the end of the video). You can develop power, distance, variability of release points, and control with this basic setup.

3rd point: Owning the space (previous video on issue).

  • It may appear that I am ‘elbowing’ Aidan out of the way in the video (I was a bit too demonstrative to make a point). You should (of course) familiarize yourself with the disc-space marking violation in the current USA(PA)U rules. My arms in this situation (absent the previously mentioned exaggeration of the motion with my elbows, and possibly even then) are within a disc space from my pivot point and my torso. I should be able to move freely without any contact with Aidan, assuming I am not causing the contact “solely by movement of the thrower”. I obviously have a clear path to do so in the video, so if Aidan encroaches on that path as I pivot; he likely will commit the disc-space violation (or a marking foul). Understanding these rules and spatial dynamics (and being able to calmly reference the rules to your opponent or an observer) will greatly improve your ability to be an effective thrower on the field.

 

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Posted by on Jan 5, 2014 in Featured, Skill WOW | 0 comments

Skill WOW 14: Cu(r)es for Common Huck Issues

Skill WOW 14: Cu(r)es for Common Huck Issues

 

There is a fair amount of information online about how to throw well. I’m hoping to add some cues to help coaches and players troubleshoot common throwing problems, bad habits, etc. These cues and tips are also, obviously, useful concepts for players to grasp before they develop bad form.

Three coaching cues for hucks:

1. Freeze after release to verify form/position and help train the thrower to keep their bodyweight over their lunge (instead of the dreaded ‘standing up follow thru‘)

2. ‘Work from the other side of the problem’ to correct constant OI hucks. Have throwers work from excessive IO and slowly ‘flatten’ their release angle towards an optimum (10-20% IO) angle. This will also help tremendously when a thrower needs to learn to huck into heavy winds.

3. Remember you are throwing a lightweight flying disc, most of the distance will come from throwing the disc well and with proper form / motion. Then you can work on adding power (via more disc spin, speeding up your motion, better translation of power from legs through core to arm through wrist to disc, etc.). You should work on building up throwing distance without sacrificing form, while also challenging your thrower’s current capacity (if you are looking for good tips on how to manage this variance to maximize skill development, I recommend checking out The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle. Check out “Part Two: Improving Skills” where he discusses how to find the ‘sweet spot’ for skill development.)

You can find plenty of info online discussing technique for good hucking form (including this piece by Parker Krug from ‘The Huddle’ which also discusses the need for an inside out (IO) release point and how that translates to being a better upwind backhand thrower). And stay tuned to Benji’s wonderful blog as he should have some good data on throwing soon due to the work he is doing.

Recent podcast mentioned in video – UTalkRaw #29: http://www.utalkraw.com/2013/11/25/episode-29-brady-meisenhelder-on-better-players-with-better-coaching/

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